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CaCl and RH correlation?

#11
I do not have the good doctor's book, but I'd like to see what he says. I teach doctors every day of my life. Tongue

500 years ago the world was flat. Books were written on its flatness, scholars expounded on its flatocity, EVERYONE knew the world was flat. As we learn, things change, even things we are dead sure about! Big Grin
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
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#12
(01-15-2010, 09:40 PM)CC Solutions Wrote:  I do not have the good doctor's book, but I'd like to see what he says. I teach doctors every day of my life. Tongue

500 years ago the world was flat. Books were written on its flatness, scholars expounded on its flatocity, EVERYONE knew the world was flat. As we learn, things change, even things we are dead sure about! Big Grin

Sir, just wondering if you have read it, being that it is the basis for measuring moisture in concrete (insitu method not to mention the writing of ASTM standard) used by practically everyone, plus considering the good doctor, the Swedish institute and Howard Kanare/CTI labs worked together to bring this technology into practice here in the USA along with Wagner building the product.

I especially like the warning at the bottom of page 22.

Thanks, thats all I needed to know
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#13
Well you have piqued my interest Ernesto. I will locate a copy of the book and read it. Smile
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
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#14
Just wanted everyone reading to know what that says on pg 22 for "Floor Slab Laid Directly on The Ground"

It says "WARNING. If a floor slab is dried during the construction by heating, this may cause the ground to heat up. Mositure can then be transferred from the ground to the concrete when heating stops."

Hmmmm, makes one think of what consequences can be.
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#15
With a good vapor barrier under the slab this is a non-issue. Without a good vapor barrier under the slab there will ALWAYS be moisture going into the slab.

(guess I don't need to read page 22 Tongue )

I still haven't found the book. Sorry.....
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
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#16
Well I will lease you my book for 100 canadian dollars a day Wink But the graphs are to die for.

So CC I guess you do what to figure out if there is a barrier under the slab? Can I bring over my camera so's I can watch you dig under the slab or stem wall to check for a vapor barrier. lol

Or maybe you could just ask, if it's an older one maybe not.

I know an old GC who used to build Post Offices. When the cheif was not looking he told the guys to poke as many holes in the barrier as they could so the dang slab would dry faster, and I mean even to the point of tearing them out.

How about the proper mil barrier? Hmmm well could go on forever about that
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#17
Ernesto Wrote:So CC I guess you do what to figure out if there is a barrier under the slab? Can I bring over my camera so's I can watch you dig under the slab or stem wall to check for a vapor barrier. lol

Or maybe you could just ask, if it's an older one maybe not.

I know an old GC who used to build Post Offices. When the cheif was not looking he told the guys to poke as many holes in the barrier as they could so the dang slab would dry faster, and I mean even to the point of tearing them out.

How about the proper mil barrier? Hmmm well could go on forever about that

AH HA! I am so glad you asked!!!

Because slabs dry to the top, a good RH test will go a long way toward telling me what the underslab vapor retarder is. Yes I will ask, and if the slab for sure has a 100% beautiful vapor retarder I will trust it. Typically I trust nothing without documentation and it must be a recent pour, say 1-5 years old at most. If it has been trenched, is old, or has a poor retarder I will recommend a moisture mitigation system. I ALWAYS take a core sample and look for a blotter layer under the slab and have the slab tested for contaminants and composition.

I'm working on a slab right now that the hospital has been repairing since 1993. I found a sand blotter and excessive potassium silicate in the top 1mm-6mm horizon. I will remove the top 7mm and install my moisture mitigation and re-level the floor.

The slab had a spray-and-pray system on it that failed within a year. The manufacturer was no help. I was called in and will make repairs and all will be well. Big Grin
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
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#18
I attended a kanare seminar at woc 2010 and he had a great CTL chart showing that they are not compatible. It is in his Wagner YouTube. However it is only a scatter chart w/o any statistically significant regression analysis.
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#19
For those interested, we placed CaCl tests adjacent to the RH probes just because we could.

Location-VMR, RH

1-7.42, 94%
2-7.09, 91%
3-7.76, 95%
4-7.76, 95%
5-7.33, 92%
7-7.04, 99%
9-8.22, 99%
10-6.21, 87%
13-5.46, 87%
15-6.32, 86%
16-6.83, 99%
21-6.32, 95%
24-8.16, 99%
WH7-4.46, 73%
WH4 8.76, 99%
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#20
(08-31-2010, 10:34 AM)mwoody Wrote:  For those interested, we placed CaCl tests adjacent to the RH probes just because we could.

Location-VMR, RH

1-7.42, 94%
2-7.09, 91%
3-7.76, 95%
4-7.76, 95%
5-7.33, 92%
7-7.04, 99%
9-8.22, 99%
10-6.21, 87%
13-5.46, 87%
15-6.32, 86%
16-6.83, 99%
21-6.32, 95%
24-8.16, 99%
WH7-4.46, 73%
WH4 8.76, 99%

I've had GC's to try to get people to install because of one good test like this. Always such a fight.
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