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Tools You Can Use

#1
After 2 years of lugging a plug-in hammer drill, small shop vac, and 100' power cords around testing jobs, I went cordless. Bought a DeWalt Cordless Hammer Drill (DC212KA - $369) and DeWalt Cordless Vac (DC 500 - $99). WOW, I love it. So much faster to move around!!

The drill has plenty of power, and the vac has enough suction to thoroughly clean the holes. The drill came with a battery and charger, but not the vac. Fortunately, I have a number of DeWalt cordless tools, so I have plenty of extra 18v batteries. Just make sure you always take your charger and an extra battery or two on jobs over 10,000 sf...you'll need to keep em charged up. I bought mine online at Home Depot. Shipping was free and I had in 2 days with standard shipping.
JK Nixon
Concrete Restoration Services, LLC
Pittsburgh, PA
http://www.rhtester.com
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#2
Thanks for the tip, JK!

I hope the piggy bank starts rattling enough to pick up those babies.
The problem with socialism is that you soon run out of other people's money.
- Margaret Thatcher

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#3
I have babies?
JK Nixon
Concrete Restoration Services, LLC
Pittsburgh, PA
http://www.rhtester.com
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#4
Interesting I was considering this real pain in the butt to get electricity without several hundred feet of cords + have had to wait for other trades sometimes before I could plug in. Hate battery stuff always runs out just when I need it. Now all we need is a cordless vac to vacuum out the holes.

Oops need to read better missed the cordless vac notation.
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#5
After a few months of operation, I find I can get about 6-8 holes drilled at about 1-2" deep per battery. The vac battery lasts for about 15 holes. I take 3 chargers and 5 batteries on any test requiring over 10 sensors which keeps me running all day long.
JK Nixon
Concrete Restoration Services, LLC
Pittsburgh, PA
http://www.rhtester.com
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#6
I was cordless to start with. I was using a Craftmen cordless hammer drill and cordless vacuum. The system was 19.2V. I believe my problem was the drill was not "heavy-duty", it was only $100. My battery only lasted for about 2-3 holes because it would take me about 5 minutes to drill a hole with that weak drill. I bought a corded drill and love it. In the future I may need to try a better cordless drill.

How do you guys keep your shop vac from blowing dust all over a job? I know in a true jobsite situation, this is not a big deal, but the majority of my testing is in retail stores during hours of operation. The dust cloud that blows out of my shop vac is embarrassing and disturbing to store employees and customers. This happens even with a brand new filter.
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#7
Craftsman vacs are notorious for that. The DeWalt I described is great. However, I dump the dust and blow out the filter behind my house with a leaf blower after every testing job. If you prefer electric, I also have a Rigid I bought off the Home Depot web site. Still use it as a back up on big jobs if needed. You won't find this particular model in the stores. It looks like a slightly oversize tool box. It runs about $100. Don't get the similar sized one with wheels. The tool box design is tons easier to carry around a job site. Plus, it has a storage compartment inside for the hose and attachments. You'll need to use the replacable hepa filters though to be dust-free. Those can be found at the stores and run about $11 for 2. They last a good while though. Only thing about the filters is that you have to position them just right inside the vac or the interior housing will tear them. Found out I did that a couple of times on jobs and had to seal the tears up with duct tape. Good luck!
JK Nixon
Concrete Restoration Services, LLC
Pittsburgh, PA
http://www.rhtester.com
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#8
Yeah, and it is a Craftmen vac too. Very small vacuum. I travel to do testing. All of my stuff needs to fit in a reasonably sized check-on bag. That is the only constraint that I have. I guess I will have to do some "at-home-engineering". I need to quit being so cheap. The vacuum was only $20, and after some rewards and coupons I had, I only spent $5 on it. Big Grin
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#9
You have to be careful with that dust exposure thing... I've had ladies complain of headaches, dizziness, and nausea and go home. And I had even shaved that morning! Big Grin

Concrete dust causes all kinds of cancer and health problems in laboratory mice. So if you are drilling in a mouse lab, use a HEPA filter.

If you are drilling in a location inhabited by humans, you need to be dust free also. The DeWalt vac is a good one, but I don't have one. I'm still using corded vacs, and finding power sucks. Sad
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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#10
One of my favorte testers now uses a Hilti mega Hepa thing for drilling. It goes WAAAAAAAA WHOMP WHOMP WHOMP WAAAAAAAAAAA WHOMP WHOMP WHOMP. Almost louder than our the major beadblaster type machines. Or certainly for size about the loudes vac I've ever heard.

Which exact Dewalt did you get? I am interested if they really can drill. It is probably one of those things you don't want to under buy for (like any tool).

I carry a small dewalt wireless vac to clean out RH probes. I think JD has one made by milwalkee if memory serves.
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