• 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
RH Testing Thick Slabs

#11
You guys are so funny! Big Grin

The slab will be wetter the deeper you go, because it dries out the top. So if you go full depth of the reader and it is too wet, then there's no point in going deeper!

Another thing you could do is core 4" hole down a few inches, remove that concrete, then place your probe at the 40% total depth.

But you guys already know.... It isn't going to be dry.... I've tested 14" slabs that were 3 years old that weren't dry yet. Sad
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
Reply

#12
(10-13-2012, 08:29 PM)CC Solutions Wrote:  You guys are so funny! Big Grin

The slab will be wetter the deeper you go, because it dries out the top. So if you go full depth of the reader and it is too wet, then there's no point in going deeper!

Another thing you could do is core 4" hole down a few inches, remove that concrete, then place your probe at the 40% total depth.

But you guys already know.... It isn't going to be dry.... I've tested 14" slabs that were 3 years old that weren't dry yet. Sad

The standard says what it says. How wet is to wet when trying to figure out how fast it is drying, or predict it? Of course if it is 100% then your right, but still, standards are standards.

Having enourmous amounts of open space below the sensor is much like having open space above the sensor., which I believe is one reason they updated 2170.
If that were the case then I could simply test at one half and inch and save some drill bit time. Tongue
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
Reply

#13
Being that slabs dry to the top, you could drill down until you hit a point that exceeds the maximum level of RH and stop there.

I'm just saying it is easy to drill to 4" and check what you have. If it is too high, it will only get higher as you drill further down.

If you want to remove the top few inches of concrete to get your sensor down 6" I can't see how that would affect a short term reading.
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
Reply

#14
Your just jealous of my idea. Dodgy

But I understand. Like testing a vct floor with adhesive bleed through. If you go down say 1 1/2 inches and it says Hi to ya, well then what else is there to say or do.
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
Reply

#15
Exactly. But for accurate testing and reporting we still need to get down to that 40% mark to make our results unquestionable when scrutinized.

BTW... I have that oozing VCT glue all over my equipment and my shoes from a job we just did a week ago.... Sad

We powder it after we get the VCT off, but if you know of a better way to keep it off my shoes I'd love to hear it. Maybe I'll buy rubber boots to wear. The slip over hospital bootie things don't work so well.
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
Reply

#16
(Hope this pic attaches never tried this here before)

Wet enough for ya?

Guess it didn't work Sad
JK Nixon
Concrete Restoration Services, LLC
Pittsburgh, PA
http://www.rhtester.com
Reply

#17
(10-17-2012, 01:07 PM)CCR Wrote:  (Hope this pic attaches never tried this here before)

Wet enough for ya?

Guess it didn't work Sad

Email it to me and I will post it if you want.
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
Reply

#18
Actually, its on my website. The shot of wet adhesive with the utility knife next to it. This moisture was so bad, one of my sensors filled up with watery adhesive between the time of placement and 72 hours later. Wish now I had taken a shot of that.
JK Nixon
Concrete Restoration Services, LLC
Pittsburgh, PA
http://www.rhtester.com
Reply

#19

.jpg   wet adhesive.jpg (Size: 33.22 KB / Downloads: 5) Yup, seen that often around here too.
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
Reply

#20
JD is right, that the slab is only going to be worse deep down- but isn't the point of the standard to find the worst case scenario? These thick slabs clearly take a long time to dry.

Also, if you're a specialist whose job is to test slabs for flooring projects, and nothing but, you're bound to obey the letter of the standard. I'd like to see Wagner develop a nice, deep extendable sleeve. Then maybe put a little magnet on top of the reader and you can fish for it to get it out. Might be fun Smile

Our biggest problem here is the "raft" style slabs which have border areas that are 300-600mm deep while the rest of the slab in 100mm. The main areas will be dry but the deep parts are still wet.
The problem with socialism is that you soon run out of other people's money.
- Margaret Thatcher

Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  ICRI pH testing Concrete Repair Bulletin eaadams 4 2,376 05-20-2014, 12:00 PM
Last Post: Ashok Kakade
  How about heated slabs? CC Solutions 4 5,503 12-20-2013, 10:23 PM
Last Post: CC Solutions
  Tandus removes moisture testing requirement eaadams 2 4,061 09-27-2013, 10:26 AM
Last Post: eaadams
  How thick is your floor? CC Solutions 21 45,246 07-19-2013, 05:14 PM
Last Post: CCR
  Calcium Carbide testing and Silicates Lepito 51 82,769 11-19-2012, 11:59 AM
Last Post: ILLENTINC
  Carbide moisture testing CC Solutions 4 8,624 09-18-2012, 06:11 PM
Last Post: CC Solutions
  Testing Cost eaadams 22 33,321 07-30-2012, 07:01 PM
Last Post: Ernesto
  Walgreen's Slabs Ernesto 62 88,111 12-07-2011, 07:27 AM
Last Post: CC Solutions
  Mositure Testing Over Concrete Discussion Ernesto 36 67,594 04-19-2011, 04:59 PM
Last Post: CC Solutions
  I offered free RH testing CC Solutions 9 20,387 04-05-2011, 05:33 AM
Last Post: CC Solutions

Digg   Delicious   Reddit   Facebook   Twitter   StumbleUpon  


Users browsing this thread:
2 Guest(s)