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99 % RH
03-07-2012, 02:53 PM,
#1
99 % RH
I have a 25 yr old slab (18,000 sq ft), on grade that has had VCT down for years with no issues, they are actually individual slabs that are apprx 12' x 16' ea ...The building sank, due to construction on a building next door, causing slab to sink apprx 2"...A company came in a "lifted" the slab by drilling 4" holes in the slab, forcing concrete down 30' into the ground, raising the slab back up, but also causing the slabs to move all over the place, meaning lots of floor leveling to do...By the way, this business is open 365 days a year & doesnt want to close...I have been contracted to rip & remove existing, reinstall new VCT...
did moisture test, calcium chloride at 3.22lbs, RH test 99%
Moisture mitigation not in the budget.... Any suggestions on how to get VCT installed without problems
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03-09-2012, 06:23 AM,
#2
RE: 99 % RH
Unless they're willing to sign a waiver releasing you from moisture related flooring failures, I wouldn't touch this one...not at 18,000 sf. Too many businesses that operate 365 days a year "just don't get it" when it comes to fixing moisture related issues. Honestly, it's like ignoring the doctor when he says you have cancer.
JK Nixon
Concrete Restoration Services, LLC
Pittsburgh, PA
http://www.rhtester.com
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03-13-2012, 07:51 PM,
#3
RE: 99 % RH
And let me add this:

In a court of law, the owner will forget he authorized you to install on a wet slab, tell the judge he has no idea what 99% means, and he is not a flooring expert.

The judge will consider you the expert and tell you that you knew there was a good chance the floor would fail and that's why you wanted a waiver, just so you could collect a check and leave the poor owner to deal with the problem at a later date. Sad

I've seen flooring guys, good guys, tossed under the bus when the job blows up.... And at that point the owner now realizes he needs a mitigation system so now he tries to get the installer to pay for it! Even if you have an iron clad case, a good attorney and expert witnesses can cost $100,000 quite easily. It's just not worth it.

I always explain the facts and let the owner make the decision. If his decision doesn't match my suggestion, he needs someone else to do the work.
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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04-25-2012, 12:13 PM,
#4
RE: 99 % RH
(03-13-2012, 07:51 PM)CC Solutions Wrote:  And let me add this:

The judge will consider you the expert and tell you that you knew there was a good chance the floor would fail (I've seen this happen to good shops so what the bad shops do is they just do CaCl - If I know they do that, they can't buy my floor because when the floor fails it isn't the shop that gets hurt, it isn't the estimator/PM, it isn't the GC, it is my Brand and the average customer will throw the baby out with the bath water.)

Even if you have an iron clad case, a good attorney and expert witnesses can cost $100,000 quite easily. It's just not worth it. Confirmed and that would be a cheap trial if insurance or government entity is involved.

I always explain the facts and let the owner make the decision. If his decision doesn't match my suggestion, he needs someone else to do the work. I wish I had mitigators here who eloquent and educated, but most have so much work they just bid. Wish they would work for their money a little more, but it is understandable, GC will 9/10 times just take the low price anyway.

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