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Cork flooring

#1
I'm considering using cork flooring in my new office. Any pros or cons you guys know of?

The manufacturer I am looking at is Wicanders.
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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#2
I installed cork laminate in my kitchen several years ago and love it. It's warm and great to walk on in your bare feet (of course you putz around in your bare feet a lot there I'm sure Big Grin).

It's also more durable than many think. Go to the Expanko website and check out some of the heavy traffic installations in their galleries.
JK Nixon
Concrete Restoration Services, LLC
Pittsburgh, PA
http://www.rhtester.com
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#3
I/m still an old gluedown cork tile fan. I like Wicanders, have a friend who was their tech guy for years. The floating click is OK. But the gluedown is bullet proof if you glue it with contact cement and put a finish on top when your done.

Check out globus cork, and the borders that they sell.

Just finished a floater from USFloors today, Natural Cork, 4 1/8 in wide click planks.
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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#4
I have 3/4 plywood floors because I was going to put down 3/4" hardwood and go through the sand and finish routine. Now one of my flooring subs is telling me this cork is awesome and from what I've seen, it does look pretty nice... I would do the click together, prefinished and ready to go.
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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#5
Did I mention it comes sealed and so easy to maintain?
JK Nixon
Concrete Restoration Services, LLC
Pittsburgh, PA
http://www.rhtester.com
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#6
If you coat them after installation you'd need a goopy, solvent-based polyurethane as water-based coatings generally aren't thick enough even for high-density cork. I thought the solvent-based polys were mostly outlawed in the USA?
The problem with socialism is that you soon run out of other people's money.
- Margaret Thatcher

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#7
(12-02-2012, 03:00 PM)Rubensgt40 Wrote:  If you coat them after installation you'd need a goopy, solvent-based polyurethane as water-based coatings generally aren't thick enough even for high-density cork. I thought the solvent-based polys were mostly outlawed in the USA?

LAW?

We don't follow no stinking laws.... Exclamation
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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#8
There is cork and then there is cork.

Don't get anything with a veneer for an office. Often these are floating / click together products. I sold lots of cork over the last decade and the items with the thin vineer always wear out.

If it were my office I'd put in LVT much more bullet proof. But, if you are going to do cork, do full cork tiles (nothing laminated), 100% glue down (use contact cement only), take note of UV stability (all cork will fade at that window, I don't care what the sales pitch is), make sure to over acclimate the cork to room conditions (I've had installers pre-place materials a week+ to make sure it was acclimated), since you are you I'd say VAP the floor, the room must have a VERY stable ambient Humidity and Temp (don't go away without control over these or you may return to a disaster), if the manufacturer says to Varnish the floor take whatever they require and double it. You want as many layers of poly on top as possible and you will have to do future refinishing less. Strictly enforce a chair mat policy. http://www.wicanders.com/xms/files/COLLECTIONS/CORKCOMFORT/INSTALLATION/Wicanders_-_Varnishing_and_Revarnishing.pdf

I'd recommend you to one of the two manufactures who I used to rep; but, they both dumped on me over the last few years.

(12-02-2012, 03:00 PM)Rubensgt40 Wrote:  I thought the solvent-based polys were mostly outlawed in the USA?

You can still get them. You just have to buy more smaller containers.

Most manufacturers use Bona Traffic. Because cork is usually used (in my world) for 'green' reasons they stay away from oil based finishes.
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#9
Perhaps you bring up some good reasons. I must admit my cork experience is limited. But I do like the stuff. One thing for sure...in an office environment, LVT is great when installed properly.
.
JK Nixon
Concrete Restoration Services, LLC
Pittsburgh, PA
http://www.rhtester.com
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#10
(12-03-2012, 02:06 PM)eaadams Wrote:  
(12-02-2012, 03:00 PM)Rubensgt40 Wrote:  I thought the solvent-based polys were mostly outlawed in the USA?

You can still get them. You just have to buy more smaller containers.

Surely in California you can't! You'd need to fill out a dozen applications, sit three exams, pay for carbon offsets and promise to breed baby seals for ten years before you can apply it, wearing the party-approved hi-viz vest of course. Well, that's what I heard... we have states like that here too...

We sell high-density cork tiles and not many folks apply water-based. Our WB is better than traffic and needs a few coats to seal!

Hey JD, you'll like this- and in keeping with my tradition of getting threads way off topic:

Anyone remember the HBO series "The Pacific"? Not only was it filmed on a mate's property down the road from me (got a tour of the setCool ) my employer also sold them the low-density cork which the special effects people use. Apparently they make explosions look a little bit more awesome... Big Grin
The problem with socialism is that you soon run out of other people's money.
- Margaret Thatcher

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