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Vet Clinic
12-07-2011, 12:07 PM,
#11
RE: Vet Clinic
Not likely. The weld keeps the floor sealed, not hold it together. It's most likely acclimation or product failure. I've seen jobs where the substrate shrunk and caused this also. Concrete can shrink more than 1/4" every 20 feet....
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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12-07-2011, 12:53 PM, (This post was last modified: 12-07-2011, 12:55 PM by Ernesto.)
#12
RE: Vet Clinic
(12-07-2011, 12:07 PM)CC Solutions Wrote:  Not likely. The weld keeps the floor sealed, not hold it together. It's most likely acclimation or product failure. I've seen jobs where the substrate shrunk and caused this also. Concrete can shrink more than 1/4" every 20 feet....

Hmmmm, so the weld is only for keeping the seam area sealed and not hold adhere the edges together? Gee, never heard that before, who told you that?

This slab is in a 20 year old strip mall. Please re read the previous posts. It has an older floor in the back, same stuff (15 years old) that is not exhibiting any moisture issues or shrinking.
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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12-07-2011, 01:17 PM,
#13
RE: Vet Clinic
The glue holds the floor down. All the weld does is make it watertight and more cleanly.

In hospitals many times the flooring will be welded in the OR's and sterile areas and just butted in the non-sterile areas.
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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12-07-2011, 02:26 PM,
#14
RE: Vet Clinic
As far as I can read I don't see any moisture issues being exhibited other than a high test using ancient probes. The complaint seems to be seams opening and thus bad heat welding. Perhaps I wasn't clear in my prior post.
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12-07-2011, 02:45 PM,
#15
RE: Vet Clinic
My point is seams aren't held together with weld. The floor should stick just fine with the glue.
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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12-07-2011, 04:06 PM,
#16
RE: Vet Clinic
(12-07-2011, 01:17 PM)CC Solutions Wrote:  The glue holds the floor down. All the weld does is make it watertight and more cleanly.

In hospitals many times the flooring will be welded in the OR's and sterile areas and just butted in the non-sterile areas.

There are chemical welds and heat welds. Welds do hold the seam together. And yes keep the seam from filling with dirt, keepoing them sterile but not just for that purpose. Look up the definition of weld.

Perhaps Ray will chime in. He is the resilient guru.

Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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12-07-2011, 04:36 PM,
#17
RE: Vet Clinic
And the chemical welds are pretty dang strong! I have tested them quite a bit. But never depend on a weld to hold your floor together. That's not the purpose! Big Grin
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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12-07-2011, 07:58 PM,
#18
RE: Vet Clinic
I actually used to install vinyl for years. Before heat welding. Funny thing when the chemical weld failed, the vinyl would shrink and curl at the seam. But heck what do I know.
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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12-08-2011, 12:02 AM,
#19
RE: Vet Clinic
Why would the vinyl shrink? Was water being introduced into the seam during cleaning operations?
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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12-23-2011, 12:15 PM,
#20
RE: Vet Clinic
All vinyl can shrink. The cheaper the vinyl the more it shrinks. The reason for this is not the vinyl. It is the fillers in the vinyl. Think of it like w/c ratio in concrete. The better concretes have less water and more concrete. The better Vinyls have MORE vinyl.

It is a big problem. Lots of vinyl installers always compression fit seams assuming that vinyl will shrink. The better vinyls call for a gap between seams before routing the vinyl as those products don't shrink.

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