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Successful floor repair after failure!
09-23-2011, 06:27 AM,
#1
Successful floor repair after failure!
I hear so much about these miracle sprays, fast fixes and low prep magic solutions for floor failures I get nauseous. Each one has a list of projects that they have 'successfully' repaired.

I have always been skeptical and want the details, the testing, the analysis, and of course the bullet proof warranty.

You can spray anything on a wet concrete slab and have a vinyl floor stick to it for a while. Especially of the flooring isn't stressed. I like to tell clients you can lay a throw rug on the floor and it will stay there forever, but try to roll a piano over it and see what happens. Confused

To clarify the absurdity of some repair methods I offer this repair scenario which was performed in a medical facility I am very familiar with. The background: Slab on grade, no vapor retarder, previous flooring was VAT. Area in question is a busy hallway with gurney traffic. Chemical adhesive abatement was followed by installation of an ultra high performance sheet flooring.
The flooring bubbled and failed almost immediately.

Manufacturer's reps were called in and gave their recommendation which was not followed. Instead the installer used his own method and the floor has been failure free for two years.

This is where 99% of those 'Our product works just use it!!!" companies stop their banter. What is this miracle method? It's cheap!! It obviously worked! What is it????

Here it is! Get out your checkbook: The installer pulled up the floor and reinstalled it. That's it. No sprays, powders, grinding, voodoo seances, or pretty manufacturer reps required. This method worked just as good as any silicate spray (better in fact because the floor isn't contaminated with silicates now!) and the client is happy. But nobody made any money selling any snake oil, so nobody is selling this method.

But you can feel free to use this secret repair that is PROVEN to work. Big Grin
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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09-26-2011, 10:29 AM,
#2
RE: Successful floor repair after failure!
The chemical adhesive abatement sounds scary. You mean they used a chemical adhesive stripper?
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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09-26-2011, 06:16 PM,
#3
RE: Successful floor repair after failure!
Yes, they are used all the time, especially to remove asbestos enriched adhesive. Confused
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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09-27-2011, 06:33 AM,
#4
RE: Successful floor repair after failure!
(09-26-2011, 06:16 PM)CC Solutions Wrote:  Yes, they are used all the time, especially to remove asbestos enriched adhesive. Confused

I've inspected a couple of floors where stripper...the orange oil stuff was used to remove cutbac adhesives then a wood floor glued to the slab. Turned into a floater real quick! On one of them the enduser contracted out the company because the box store told them it needed to be removed prior to installation and they would not do it.

The box store got away with it because they didn't put the stripper on.Dodgy I thought they should have done a bond test first but we all know they never do that kinda stuff.

Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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09-27-2011, 06:39 AM,
#5
RE: Successful floor repair after failure!
Or they do a bond test on an area they rinsed really well.

The adhesive dissolvers will turn the glue into a slurry that will absorb into the concrete. It's pretty darn hard to get all those chemicals out of the concrete. And once again, anything like that in the concrete voids the adhesive manufacturer's warranty.

I recommend mechanically removing all adhesives. Although I have made some good money coming in to mitigate after the chemical companies leave. Big Grin
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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09-27-2011, 08:10 PM,
#6
RE: Successful floor repair after failure!
(09-27-2011, 06:39 AM)CC Solutions Wrote:  Or they do a bond test on an area they rinsed really well.

Uh huh, rinsing a home throughly is kinda out of the question unless the sheetrock is a foot off the ground. Smile not to mention all the water that goes back into the concrete that takes ten times longer to exit than mix water.

Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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09-28-2011, 06:20 AM,
#7
RE: Successful floor repair after failure!
We clean concrete in hospitals where the sheetrock is on the floor. We use a 4,000 psi pressure washer and a rotating scrubber and water blast the floor! We even spray down the lower half of the walls! Then we squeegee up the water, vacuum up everything we can and immediately apply a water borne epoxy to the concrete.

The amount of water absorbed by drywall in that brief exposure is minimal..
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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09-28-2011, 06:44 AM,
#8
RE: Successful floor repair after failure!
(09-28-2011, 06:20 AM)CC Solutions Wrote:  We clean concrete in hospitals where the sheetrock is on the floor. We use a 4,000 psi pressure washer and a rotating scrubber and water blast the floor! We even spray down the lower half of the walls! Then we squeegee up the water, vacuum up everything we can and immediately apply a water borne epoxy to the concrete.

The amount of water absorbed by drywall in that brief exposure is minimal..

You have no clue about the difference in residential and commercial work do you?

Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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09-28-2011, 02:20 PM,
#9
RE: Successful floor repair after failure!
No difference except for getting paid and maybe working with unions...
Concrete is concrete, and drywall is drywall. You can tape plastic to the walls and seal the bottom edge to the floor and blast a hurricane in someone's basement if you'd like, and really there would be no difference than if you were in a commercial hallway.

What do you think the difference is? Huh
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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09-28-2011, 02:51 PM,
#10
RE: Successful floor repair after failure!
Well first off most people are not going to entirely move out of a home so you can come in and powerwash everything including the walls.

You've got furniture, possibly expensive furnishings, paintings/artwork, draperies, moisture sensitive things like books and other floorcoverings to worry about. Not to mention wood doors and casings. It ain't all sheetrock and steel doors and casings like in hospitals.

Secondly people have to live there during the flooring install. They don't like having their lives totally disrupted. In commercial work everyone goes where....home.
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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