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Debris in the Sensor

#1
I was just wondering if static electricity from a vacuum will affect the sensor. I've had concrete debris get in there a couple times and had to vacuum it out. It didn't seem to hurt it any that time.

I accidently fried my pc's video card doing that once.
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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#2
Oh my God! Where do you come up with this stuff?? Tongue


Hmmm... Off the cuff.... No problemo. The concrete will discharge any static.

Am I right??? Huh
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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#3
Electronic circuts can be destroyed by static JD but I think you know that already.

I don't think anyone knows for certain JD. But I hear Jason has a few blue sensors left over he can test with. Mine cost to much to play with like that.

Looks like I'll be having to...well forced to upgrade to the orange 4.0 soon. There's only one 5 pack left in Tucson. grrrrrr

Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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#4
Hey, I'm hip with static. But there has to be a static charge built up to begin to create this dilemma, then there has to be a discharge across the circuit for damage to occur. I don't think sucking debris out of the hole the sensor sits in is going to cause a static charge, and if it does, I believe the tube will immediately ground out to the concrete, effectively not allowing the charge to build up in the first place. So I guess my position is that you'd be hard pressed to create a residual static charge in the sensor.

Now, proving that it will never happen is nearly impossible because you'd need to test countless scenarios and prove each individual parameter provides indicative results. Whereas proving the potential for static charge retention would be rather simple by holding a probe in your hand and rubbing it with rabbit's fur, then discharging the static to a grounded object. This doesn't prove it could happen in the concrete though!

Now imagine being there on the job site, your back turned to a group of burley construction workers, stroking your Wagner probe with a soft fur pelt, elbows flying around, and suddenly you spasm as the electrical charge is released and you shout "YES YES!!! I DID IT!" Blush

NOT a good way to start off on the right foot at a job site... Maybe you should just have faith that it's not an issue...
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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#5
I think the difference between your rabbit fur coat and the concrete is that the vacuum is constantly forming a static charge.

Try this. Ground yourself to the slab and get your vacuum out and clean your pc with it. Then tell let us know if your pc is still working Undecided
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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#6
So where are you hypothesizing the static is building up? Let's get that understood first. You need to give us an idea where the static is forming and where it is discharging. Huh

Oh, and have you ever had a problem vacuuming out probes? I have never done it so I haven't. I blow them out. And that can screw them up! I blew one out using a can of compressed air, and of course the air shoots out cold as all get-out and even some liquid squirted out and froze my sensor.

So now I take a tube and blow through the tube into the sensor if it needs to be cleaned. Easy to carry. No power needed. I came up with that idea after I got debris in my eye from just leaning over the hole and blowing it out using just my mouth. Yeah, the stuff comes out and gets you right in the eye! So I was walking around like this Wink people asking what's the deal, Arrrr Matey!! Have ya seen me ship? I seem to have lost me ship!

That's my debris advice in a nut sack. Don't use compressed air / CO2, and don't blow with your lips. Do keep your distance, and do make sure the sensor re-acclimates after you blow warm or cool air on it. Exclamation
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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#7
Hee hee, dirt in yer eye. Did you see it coming? lol


My household vacuum is a built in and the main motor/bag is in the garage. It still fried my video card. All I did was dust the top of the desktop. If it touched the sensor I think it might have the ability to discharge.

http://electrostaticsolutions.blogspot.com/2007/04/how-does-vacuum-cleaner-cause-static.html
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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#8
(10-04-2011, 06:04 PM)Ernesto Wrote:  Hee hee, dirt in yer eye. Did you see it coming? lol


My household vacuum is a built in and the main motor/bag is in the garage. It still fried my video card. All I did was dust the top of the desktop. If it touched the sensor I think it might have the ability to discharge.

http://electrostaticsolutions.blogspot.com/2007/04/how-does-vacuum-cleaner-cause-static.html

Where in the world did you find a static electricity blog???? And I'm not very surprised to find Jason is one of the top ten posters on the blog either...

The Static doctor: Dr Jeremy Smallwood has been working as a static electricity consultant since 1987. He started his company Electrostatic Solutions Ltd to give top level static electricity research and development and consultancy services in 1997.

Dr. Jeremy Smallwood? Tongue

With a name like that I'm sure he had plenty of time in college for studying...
"Hey Brenda, do you and Sarah want to go on a date with me and my friend, Smallwood?? No? Maybe next week?" Big Grin
JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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#9
(10-06-2011, 11:31 AM)CC Solutions Wrote:  
(10-04-2011, 06:04 PM)Ernesto Wrote:  Hee hee, dirt in yer eye. Did you see it coming? lol


My household vacuum is a built in and the main motor/bag is in the garage. It still fried my video card. All I did was dust the top of the desktop. If it touched the sensor I think it might have the ability to discharge.

http://electrostaticsolutions.blogspot.com/2007/04/how-does-vacuum-cleaner-cause-static.html

Where in the world did you find a static electricity blog???? And I'm not very surprised to find Jason is one of the top ten posters on the blog either...

The Static doctor: Dr Jeremy Smallwood has been working as a static electricity consultant since 1987. He started his company Electrostatic Solutions Ltd to give top level static electricity research and development and consultancy services in 1997.

Dr. Jeremy Smallwood? Tongue

With a name like that I'm sure he had plenty of time in college for studying...
"Hey Brenda, do you and Sarah want to go on a date with me and my friend, Smallwood?? No? Maybe next week?" Big Grin

There were blogs aplenty on how vacuums create static. The hardest part about choosing one was finding one you might understand. burrrrp
Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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#10
Even though I seal my orange caps with Loctite Adhesive Caulk after placing, I have occasionally seen traces of dust in the Wagner Sensors when I return after 72 hours. Never had issues with suspected static electricity in all the tests I've done, let alone have it even cross my mind.
JK Nixon
Concrete Restoration Services, LLC
Pittsburgh, PA
http://www.rhtester.com
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