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Cold Expansion Joint
08-08-2011, 11:12 AM (This post was last modified: 08-08-2011 11:31 AM by eaadams.)
Post: #1
Cold Expansion Joint
Does anyone know how to properly patch a cold expansion joint with a metal rod in it to receive a high moisture vinyl floor moisture system? I'm afraid the active joint will push up any patching compound I put in there.

Edit: I can't honor it all the way through the floor as it will be a game court and kids will be playing over it. (aka would be a tripping hazard)
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08-08-2011, 11:57 AM
Post: #2
RE: Cold Expansion Joint
Well... Not seeing it....

You can try and determine the amount of movement. If it is minimal, you can use a semi-rigid epoxy or 2 part urethane that is weaker than the concrete but stronger than necessary to support rolling loads (remember that Euco Qwikjoint 200 I mentioned?). MM80 is a good semi-rigid epoxy. If the joint moves more than maybe 50% it can fracture though... So a 1/4" joint can maybe move an 1/8" (winging it here with numbers!Big Grin ) which may affect your flooring anyway, rubber would probably be okay, but VCT will crack, vinyl... who knows?

Or honor it through! You can buy a pre-made joint which is a flexible material sandwiched between two metal sides that gets epoxied into the joint (you need to route out the joint to fit the expansion joint in). The joint then expands and squishes as the concrete moves. It is flush with the finished floor. You will probably have to epoxy the original joint closed and re-cut the new joint so it matches the layout of your floor, or you can install a slip sheet if the honored joint is pretty close to the existing joint.

JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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08-08-2011, 01:42 PM
Post: #3
RE: Cold Expansion Joint
Now you see it!

[Image: IMG_0772.JPG]

The answers you gave are similar to the tech department.

I'm going to tell GC to get a concrete sub in there.
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08-08-2011, 02:15 PM
Post: #4
RE: Cold Expansion Joint
Hmmmm. Thanks for the visual! What's with the meandering? That's what I meant when I said you may need a slip sheet or cut the joint a bit straighter. If you put that wavy thing in the floor the owner will freak!

JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
[email protected]
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08-09-2011, 09:28 PM
Post: #5
RE: Cold Expansion Joint
Owner's rep walks into meeting. She is a tilt up concrete engineer in silicon valley. SWEET. They all came to sences.

Now the rH..... See how dark that slab is. Testing came in from low 80's to 99%. I think the pH is like 12. UGH. So annoying.

For some reason with this one tester every time I get some super high test results. He uses putty to seal the wagner 'cap' to the sleeve / concrete. Might that throw results off?
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08-09-2011, 09:34 PM
Post: #6
RE: Cold Expansion Joint
The Wagner reads at the bottom of the hole. The sealing fins on the side of the barrel assure it is just reading from the bottom of the hole. Sealing the cap to the top of the barrel should have no impact on the sealed sensor.

Maybe your readings are always high because he drills straight through the cement into the ground below!

One thing I have always admired about testing with Wagner probes is they are so consistent. If you are reading between 80 and 90 I would look for an answer to that discrepancy.... Is the slab of uniform thickness and are the holes at uniform depth?

JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
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08-09-2011, 09:55 PM
Post: #7
RE: Cold Expansion Joint
Holes are uniform. Slab is 4" from where they have seen. It is a remodel tilt up. (as are most projects in south sf bay area)

I'll have his report tomorrow. $170+ per probe but he does a lot of follow up consulting.

Slab had VCT and conductive tile on it for years. I suspect cutback adhesive. Did cutback ever NOT have asbestos?
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08-09-2011, 10:02 PM
Post: #8
RE: Cold Expansion Joint
Oh, old slab! Well then moisture can be high in areas where the vapor retarder is compromised and pipes are broken, or any other number of things.

You'll have to ask an adhesive guru about the cutback.... Tongue

JD Grafton
Concrete Answers for Flooring Problems
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08-14-2011, 08:23 PM
Post: #9
RE: Cold Expansion Joint
Me thinks the newer cutbac adhesives do not have asbestos. Why would they? How old was that last flooring installed

Stephen Perrera dba
Top Floor Installation Co.
http://www.tucsonazflooring.com
http://www.floorsavior.com
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08-14-2011, 09:50 PM
Post: #10
RE: Cold Expansion Joint
Lost the job. RH came in at 99% and customer decided to go elsewhere instead of doing it right. We refused to do it wrong.
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